Features Vs Benefits: How to describe your offer to make it more irresistible

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  If we could just comfortably tell others to invest in our ideas and solutions without going into much detail, how awesome would that be?

Talking about the features and benefits of your program can sometimes make you feel like an imposter that you want to hide.

Maybe you find it extremely challenging to convince your ideal audience that your ideas and solutions are worth investing in.

Now, there are some entrepreneurs who execute big 5-6 figure launches...and they drop the ball when it actually comes to delivering on your promises.

You've bought into their promises before. The big hype, the affiliates, the crazy numbers and testimonials. It was just too darn convincing you had to be a part of the crew.

It all comes down to this: the thin line between features and benefits.

I'll share the story of Sally, the entrepreneur.

Entrepreneur Sally wants to sell a 6-wk online weight loss course to busy moms who have no time to go to the gym. Her course costs $1,997.

She is smart, funny, talented, and her course does deliver on its promises.

But here's the problem:

She is struggling to make sales. People are not buying her course. She thinks something is wrong with her funnels, her ads, or her brand visuals.

But she is overlooking one thing:

...her sales copy.

If your offer is solid, you have the right audience, your marketing is dope, and your course is legit...yet you aren't making any or enough sales, look into your sales copy.

Are you just listing what your program is all about? Are you taking your clients on a transformative journey with you? Or are they unconvinced that it is really for them?

When trying to persuade your audience to work with you over any other "expert" out there, you need to show, not tell.

Show your clients what the future will be like with your program. Show what the future will be like without your program.

Sally could describe her program like this

You will receive 200 pages of colorful meal plans and calendars.

You will receive a big and colorful set of cook ware.

You will also get 6 coaching calls with me to talk about your weight journey.

Busy moms will look at this and go..hmm. Yes, but how does it help me?

What if Sally described her offer like this:

Lose 6 sizes in 6 weeks without going to the gym or dieting!

When you join XYZ:

You will get my ultimate 200-page go-to guide for healthy and delicious meals you can in less than 30 minutes! No more "I don't know what to eat!"

You will get a beautiful meal planner and ingredient list to make your shopping faster and more organized than ever....so you can banish 'mom guilt' and spend more time with your kids!

You will get exclusive access to me for 6 weeks so we can design a weight loss goal that fits your lifestyle. No gym memberships. Just you and me...in the comfort of your own home!

So what changed?

Sally moved from describing her deliverables (features) to describing what the future will look like for busy moms (benefits).

Instead of just talking about her 200-page meal guide, she added the time-saving factor and the ease from decision paralysis. Busy moms like that!

She talked about meal planning and a ingredient list that makes shopping easier so she can spend more time with her kids.

And instead of just saying you get 6 coaching calls, she appealed to the coziness of a relationship between two friends.

Now, do this:

  1. Go back to your sales page.
  2. Look out for descriptors that don't visualize the transformation your clients will experience.
  3. Start by swapping them out for images of how they see their future with your solution.

How are you going to make your offer a no-brainer for your clients? 

Please share in the comments below!